Myth Busters

Myth: All Sunscreens Are Created Equal

In the U.S., the labeling of sunscreens, regulated by the FDA, is measured according to the SPF (sun protection factor) grading system. The SPF number refers to the product’s ability to block out UVB (burning) radiation but does not pertain to the product’s ability to block dangerous UVA (aging) light. UVA rays destroy our collagen and elastin, causing wrinkles and sagging, stimulate pigment-producing melanocytes to release brown melanin, resulting in “liver spots” on the face, hands and chest, and can mutate your DNA, eventually leading to skin cancer.  So, it is important that when you are looking for a sunscreen you look for one with broad spectrum UVA/UVB protection. We encourage you to check the active ingredients label on the back of the box or tube to be certain you are getting adequate protection. Look for these active ingredients in your broad spectrum sunscreen:

To protect against UVA rays:
Avobenzone
(aka Parsol® 1789): chemical block
Mexoryl®:
chemical block
Zinc Oxide:
physical block

To protect against UVB rays:
Cinnamate:
chemical block
Ensulizole:
chemical block
Octinoxate:
chemical block
Padimate A:
chemical block
Padimate O:
chemical block

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